Monologue Monday

Monologue Monday: It Came from Texas by Josh Weckesser

Howdy and welcome back to Unknown Playwrights and Monologue Monday!

This is our second monologue from Josh Weckesser. The previous one is here.

This monologue is from a one-act play entitled It Came from Texas. The summary comes straight from the playwright’s site:

SUMMARY:

It Came From Texas is the story of a monster that rampages the country side, eating all in it’s path. This intrepid group of gamblers take refuge in a basement, where they do their best to ignore the world. This succeeds only in so much as the Hate Music will allow, not to mention the Female Overmind. A sci-fi fantasy western with a twist (NOTE: The previous statement is false). Really, it’s about a bunch of people pissing a day away, languishing in each other in the way that only a group of people that knows each other too well can languish.

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Best $4.99 you’ll ever spend!

The monologue itself features neurotic Tim dealing with a super-clingy Beth, who still loves her ex, Jonas.

You can find the monologue on the author’s site.

For more about Mr. Weckesser, please check out our other monologue from him.

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B

 

These are two very different takes on the same material. Hopefully we’ll see more folks using this one.

Thanks!

Monologue Monday

Monologue Monday: Kim Kutledge by Josh Weckesser

Hello and welcome back to Unknown Playwrights. Now that I have finally defeated the NaNoWriMo beast, Monologue Monday is back from hiatus!

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When you really don’t have an illustration for a monologue, so you end up with the cover of a bound volume of a German theatre magazine from the 1900s.

This week we bring you Kim Kutledge. This monologue was written by a (then) high school student for high school students. As far as high schooler-written monologues go, it’s not half-bad.

I can see why actors would like this. It has a whole range of emotions and involves hallucinations and Keanu Reeves. It also ends on a positive note. It looks a little difficult to pull off because it’s all over the place. And why do actors love monologues about mental illness? (Remember that Crazy monologue?) Also, Kim is unusually self-aware.

You can read the monologue in its entirety here.

The author, Josh Weckesser had his own website once. He seems to have worked in the Chicago theatre world as a lighting guy. In fact, here he is talking about that:

The monologue is based upon a character in a full-length play, Gray Matter, that I haven’t read.

Without further ado, here are the Kim Kutledge monologues.

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C

Thanks for reading/watching. Hope to see you again on Unknown Playwrights.