Posters/Wednesday Link Dump

Wednesday Link Dump

Hello and welcome to the pandemic edition of Unknown Playwrights’ theatrical link dump. This is where we usually post all sorts of fascinating, interesting a titillating links related to theatre. But theatre is closed. Except it isn’t. It’s gone online and we will bring you those online links soon.

Usually this link dump is brought to you by theatrical posters, but this week (same as last) it’s brought to you by shows closed due to pandemic.

The best one was from a Korean theatre that linked directly to the government’s constantly-updated COVID-19 site. Way to go, responsible theatre (and government)!

Famous playwrights are not immune to pandemic.

A fun Canadian theatre is doing fun Canadian-y things online

Read an almost NSFW play about the last bottle of hand sanitizer on Earth.

A Quarantine Vogel-style bake-off LIVE!

Roberto Bolaño’s 2666 is available via free streaming from the Goodman Theatre.

Some crazy-ass German puppetry (is there really any other kind?)

American playwright/iconoclast David Hansen has been forcing asking actors to record his short plays whilst in quarantine. The results are hilariously compelling. Mister Hansen was also the subject of this week’s Monologue Monday.

Drunk MacBeth, drunk Pride & Prejudice, all based in Berlin.

Andrew Lloyd Webber and Lin-Manuel Miranda are having a cute playoff on Twitter. Here is Andrew’s version of a Hamilton song.

La Boheme LIVE!

A fascinating group out of South Africa

Nightly opera streams from the Met

RSC’s Richard II is so hot right now. Browse around their site. They have plenty of other streaming options.

When 30 playwrights write monologues of the livestream audience’s choosing.

Caveat comedy group is livestreaming their shows.

The Globe Theatre is streaming Shakespeare plays (if you have the dough). Arseholes.

Supermegafamous playwright Young Jean Lee gave a free online storytelling class. I didn’t want to download the platform, so you can figure out how to watch it.

LaMaMa is streaming some stuff.

Is Tiny Theatre2020’s version of the Little Theatre Movement?

Theatre without theatre (but with Instagram)

Here’s a link with even more links/overview of online theatre resources

Tony and Helen Hayes-winning actress Alice Ripley has been livestreaming

This claims to be a livestreaming thing from Hungary, but I have no idea where said stream is. #theatrepeople

Livestream a bunch of Broadway shows for free, including shows with Orlando Bloom, Lee J. Cobb and Hugh Jackman

All the Web’s a Stage will happen April 23.

Something for the kiddos.

Learn storytelling live at Theatre Lab.

This list is shorter than most lists , for obvious reasons. If you have any other online theatre stuff, feel free to message me with the link and I’ll add it.

In the meantime, here is a short play about a suicidal candy bar. Because of course it is!

Monologue Monday

Monologue Monday: Cactus and Karma by David Hansen

Hello everyone and welcome to a very special pandemic edition of Monologue Monday! Today we bring you two pieces of Quarantine Theatre.

These are monologues written by playwright David Hansen and performed by actors under quarantine. How claustrophobic is that?

Playwright Hansen and his gang of thespians have created something called The Short Play Project where they perform Hansen’s plays from the comfort of their very own quarantine.

CACTUS

The first play we’re profiling is about cactus sex. Kinda.

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OH YEAH!!!!

It’s actually about vulnerability and is more of a metaphor. I know, I was kinda crushed, too.

This monologue can be used by any gender.

ONE

The guys, at work. They call me the cactus. Not “Cactus,” that would feel like a

nickname. “What’s up, Cactus?” That would be cute. No, that’s what they say behind

my back. [concerned, under the breath] “Don’t fuck up today, the Cactus is out for

blood.”[normal voice] Which is fine. I’m not there to have fun or be liked. I have work to

do and so do they, I don’t care if they are afraid to deal with me, they have to and that’s

it.

I do hate when I am referred to as prickly. That bothers me. But tough? Okay. Yes. Call

me tough. Is it because I am aggressive? No, it’s not. A cactus isn’t aggressive. A cactus

doesn’t leap out at you from a dark alley and murder you. That would be funny right.

[hard stare] No, you have to mess with it. Then you get hurt. That was a warning. To

you. I guess.

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Look, but don’t touch.

I am a seed that fell in a stony place, with no roots and little hope for survival. But when

the sun rose up I was not scorched, I said, “up yours, sun,” and grew anyway. That was

a biblical reference.

My toughness is my defense. My thorns are a defense. My just coming out and telling

you these things. That doesn’t mean I’m “letting you in.” I am stating the obvious so you

can’t tell me later that you didn’t know.

But I’d like to have sex with you, which means one of two things are going to happen.

You get close and I hurt you, or I let you cut me open to experience all the sweetness I

have hidden inside of me and then I die. I am no longer a cactus.

So ask yourself. Which outcome is more likely to happen?

“The guys at work” always seemed to be assholes, so I wouldn’t put much stock in what they say.

However, this is an interesting play about perception, vulnerability and human nature.

To download the monologue, just click here.

KARMA

The second play is about that age old concept of karma. The play is about a millipede.

millipede-phil-nosler
I like to pretend it’s this millipede.

We’re not really told why/how this millipede ended up at its karmic destination, but we don’t really need to be, either.

ONE

I live. I live. I eat. I live. I hunt. I eat. Eat what is in front of me. Navigate the surface. Always moving forward. Across the surface. Surface down. Surface across. Surface up. This is up, I am up, I live, I move, move unencumbered up. Vast plane of nothing, no food, no dark, but safe. Safe, I am, from beings, impossibly large beings, gigantic meatsticks, the great dangers. Also giant, but less so, the beasts who torture, crush, consume. Up surface they cannot go. But no food, I live. I eat, must eat. So, to the surface, with obstacles, surfaces smooth, surfaces nubbly, moving to catch, consume, sate, moving on. I was. I was. I recall. A meatstick once, once giant, a giant meatstick, with, I had, my, the way the world was, to me, mine, I understood. Understood. Understood me. A youth, young for meatstick, very old for me, turns of dark, numbering in the hundreds. A child? A child, curious, thoughts, ideas, catching, hunting, pinching, one like me, separating me, part by part, separated, causing chaos, call it pain. Ending life. I was. I was not. No longer child, now me. To learn. To truly understand.

That’s it. I’ve known several meatsticks in my life and many of them would be better off as millipedes.

You can download the play here.

To see all the plays of Hansen’s noble experiment, please check out the YouTube playlist.

Also, please check out Mr. Hensen’s website where he maintains a blog and other goodies. If you have access to the New Play Exchange, dude is on there, too.

This concludes our very special pandemic Monologue Monday. Everyone be safe. See you soon!

 

 

 

Posters/Wednesday Link Dump

Wednesday Link Dump

Howdy and welcome back to Unknown Playwrights! Our Link Dump lives on! This week’s edition is brought to you by theatre cancellation notices due to COVID-19. Hope everyone’s doing okay!!!!

The Joys of Musical Theatre Cosplay

Sometimes you gotta stand up for yourself

Battling Imposter Syndrome in the theatre

74 Must-see muscial movies

Broadway performer Grace McLean speaks

Musicals of the 2010s, a complete list (except the one I wrote isn’t on this list)

Playwright Chelsea Frandsen’s new mantra

Lee Blessing interviewed

Tyler Dwiggins interviewed

Edith Freni interviewed

Exploring the lives of Nubian women through theatre

Narration through song in South Africa

Dancing with a deer, a jaguar or a snake

COVID-19 has led to The Short Play Project

Some folks (Johnny Cash’s daughter) think Shakespeare plagiarized wrote King Lear while under quarantine. I don’t think so, but when did the world actually care what I think?

Approved plays for livestreaming

What does a playwright do? (This playwright mostly collects rejection notices)

New Mexico had a fun theatre festival

Aphra Behn, the first professional woman writer (and spy and stuff)

An intro to Czech theatre

The history of Czech theatre (and opera)

African Americans and Shakespeare

Is Shakespeare racist? (probably???)

Multiculturalism in Shakespeare’s plays (side note: Has England been xenophobic since England began?)

Two goats and two scarred artists

Liverpudlian Molière

Unlike in WW2 France, collaborators are good people in theatre

That Fidel Castro play tho

Teaching theatre tech when you don’t know theatre tech. Sounds fun.

Costume and prop challenges

And that’s it. But we’ll leave you with some Doo Wop 45s….

Posters/Wednesday Link Dump

Wednesday Link Dump

Hello, hello! Welcome back to Unknown Playwrights! Here is this week’s link dump, brought to you by posters for Thomas Middleton’s The Revenger’s Tragedy.

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McGill University, Canada 2012. Cute skull.
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Rhode Island, USA. 2016. Half-skull.
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Waterloo, Canada, 1987. Still got that skull.
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UK, 1969. Skeletons with goofy hats.
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Limerick, Ireland. 2009. No skull, just someone who forgot to shave.
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Massachusetts, USA. 2019. Skull becomes clown…
The Revengers Tragedy Oct 2015 Final Poster-218x308
York, UK. 2015. How did I miss this? 
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When the paperback cover is cooler than the poster. Pulled this off a Korean blog.

Ben Vereen allgeedly sexually abuses cast members, gets theatre award.

Broadway vs. Coronavirus

Respect the sound design

Macbeth gets gender-bent

Make a popular play. Make sure nobody can actually see it. Hold a lottery for the sheeple who still want to see it.

Playwright reminisces about when his play was at the Akron library

About a Ghoul looks fun

There’s a play called Corpse!

Of Mice and Men reset in the Philippines.

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

The Book of Mormon back on tour

Solving the queer problem play

Pandemic prices on Broadway

Does the National Theatre Institute actually help anyone?

Tickets to this pervy show cost more than my rent.

Three Off-Broadway plays dealing with death

Playwright Helen Banner gets interviewed

Playwright Emily Bohannon gets interviewed

Decolonizing theatre practice

The journey of an artistic director

Namibian theatre blogger and playwright Donald Matthys interviewed

Somehow Chinese dance troupe Sen Yun is connected to Trump. So bizarre.

Theatre in the schools, in Benin.

Raising gender awareness through theatre,in Benin.

A one-man show in English,in Berlin.

Oregon Shakespeare gets their very own Intimacy Director

Stage Blood: A How-to Guide

Time to study Middleton’s The Changeling

The Duchess of Malfi is always fun.

All about the revenge tragedy

The beginnings of revenge tragedy

Even more Duchess of Malfi

Thanks for reading and now we leave you with a really cute GIF of Mocha and Milk. Now if they starred in their own revenge tragedy:

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Pictured: Mocha & Milk’s Tragedy of Vengeance
Posters/Wednesday Link Dump

Wednesday Link Dump

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Wednesday Link Dump. I’ve been battling an extended version of the flu, but will still put out a link dump for ya.

This week’s link dump is brought to you by Korean posters of Molière’s The Imaginary Invalid. If you want to see Polish posters of the same play, just click here.

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Yeongsan University, 2019.
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2005
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Nice Godfather motif there.
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2017
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So sketchy.
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2015 comes with a map.
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Looks like the Comédie Française visited Korea in 2011.
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2018.

A playwright reminisces about a roadshow 10 years ago

A British play about bigamy!

All the Natalie Portmans is an actual play.

To Kill A Mockingbird is further ensconed as America’s secular Bible

John Cleese wrote a play

Black History Month – LIVE!

Dance Theatre Uganda!

Five women artists, five disciplines, one Istanbul.

Six of the funniest costume change mishaps

The Underwritten Sex Workers of Musical Theatre <<<must read

Historical playbills

That time King Lear had a happy ending

Playwright Mark Wilding interviewed

Old interview with Trav S.D

Britain’s first permanent puppet theatre has a blog.

Youth Theatre in Kuala Lumpur

What month is it? Theatre in Our Schools Month

Hedda Gabler can tweet now.

Henrik Ibsen, father of modern drama

Notes from the rehearsal room

The importance of Ludvig Holberg

Holberg, the Danish Molière (I learned that until 1722 plays were only staged in French and German in Denmark)

World Ballet Day exists

When a famous Finnish theatre director is accused of human trafficking!

Three Eritrean Plays

Choreographer Lorin Latarro

5 funny plays for high schoolers

One of Thailand’s most daring theatre troupes

Intimacy Choreography has its own link dump!

The enfent terrible of Romanian theatre

Get Carter became a play

That’s it for this week’s link dump. Now for all of you who ever wondered what the Get Carter theme would sound like with surf guitars, your day has come.

 

Monologue Monday

Monologue Monday: Laundry and Bourbon (Elizabeth & Hattie) by James McLure

Howdy and welcome back to Monologue Monday. This week’s monologues come from a play entitled Laundry and Bourbon (aka Southern women drinking and gossiping).

Laundry-and-Bourbon-Flyer
In Siloam Springs, Arkansas.

The play claims to have a plot. I stole this one from playdatabase:

The setting is the front porch of Roy and Elizabeth’s home in Maynard, Texas, on a hot summer afternoon. Elizabeth and her friend Hattie are whiling away the time folding laundry, watching TV, sipping bourbon and Coke, and gossiping about the many open secrets which are so much a part of small-town life. They are joined by the self-righteous Amy Lee who, among other tidbits, can’t resist blurting out that Roy has been seen around town with another woman. While the ensuing conversation is increasingly edged with bitter humor, from it emerges a sense of Elizabeth’s inner strength and her quiet understanding of the turmoil which has beset her husband since his return from Vietnam. He is wild, and he is unfaithful, but he needs her and she loves him. And she’ll be waiting for him when he comes home–no matter what others may say or think.

Admittedly, this isn’t my cup of tea. The Southern-fried genre of theatre has been done much better (think Tennessee Williams) and the small-town village mentality and escape thereof has been better portrayed by Inge. As for comedy, I know real-life Southerners 10 times funnier than this play.

However, on the plus side, it does provide three female roles, some strong. It also provides decent audition monologue material.

Let’s take a look at the character breakdown:

Screen Shot 2020-02-23 at 5.26.03 PM

Two of these characters have monologues we can explore.

Elizabeth: I remember the first day he drove into town in that car.

So these people like to talk about the past. Elizabeth is remembering when she saw Roy with his car.

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Elizabeth: Wish tonight was 10 years ago.

Elizabeth has reached a point in her life and relationship when she wishes she could go into the back seat of a Ford Thunderbird 10 years ago. Also, in fiction, why does it seem men need to teach women about their bodies?

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A

 

B

 

C

 

Hattie: Figure I better check on the kids.

Hattie complains about her kids. The monologue is here.

Hattie: Figure I better check on the kids. No telling what devilment they’ve gotten up to. (Dialing.) Everything gonna turn out fine you’ll see. (On the phone.) Hello? Cheryl? Cheryl dear, this is Mommy. . . Mommy. . . your mother. (Aside.) Child needs a hearing aid. What’s that dear? Vernon Jr. threw a rock at you? Well, throw one back at him, honey. Show him who’s boss. Cheryl, sweetheart, put Grandma on the phone. . . Cheryl this week! (Pause.) Sounds -like they’re running her ragged. Hello? Little Roger. Is that you. I don’t want to talk to you right now punkin, I want to talk to Grandma. . . ’cause I want to talk to Grandma . . . yes Grandma does have baggy elbows. Now lemme talk to her. . . what’s that? Honey of course Mommy loves you. . . I love you all the same. . . Do I love you more than who? Fred Flintstone. Yes. More than Paul Newman no, but Fred Flintstone yes. . . It’s a grown-up joke honey. Now put Grandma on . . . She’s what? Tied up! You untie her you hear me? You want a switchin’? . . . Then you untie her, right now. . . Marion? That you. . . Oh, you were playin’ . . . Oh good I thought they had you tied up for real. . . How they doing. . . yes . . . yes. . . yes I agree there is too much violence on TV. . . yes I’ll pick them up at five. . . No I won’t be late. . . You have my solemn word. . . Goodbye. What’s that? Little Roger? . . . Yes it’s nice to hear your voice again too . . . You’re playing what? Sniper? Vernon Jr. has climbed a tree in the backyard and he has a brick? Well, little Roger, listen and listen carefully, under no circumstances go under that tree. . . He’s gonna drop the brick on your head, sweetheart. . . So don’t go under the tree. That’s just what he wants. . . OK . . . OK . . . “Yabba dabb doo” to you too. (She hangs up.) He’ll walk right under that tree. The child has no more sense than God gave a screwdriver.

A

 

Hattie: Today I went through living hell.

She also goes shopping with said kids. The monologue is here.
HATTIE
Today I went through living hell. I went shopping with my children. Disastrous. When my kids hit a department store, they go berserk. I think it activates something in their glands. We hadn’t been in J.C. Penney’s five minutes before they scattered in all direction. Now you take my little Cheryl. She’s a sweet little thing but bless her heart she’s a thief. It’s time I faced facts, ‘Lizabeth. My daughter is a kleptomaniac. As soon as we got into that store, she started stuffing her pockets. Stuffing her clothing. She ran away from me and ten minutes later I saw her. I barely recognized my only daughter. She looked like a beach ball with legs. Telling her to put it back is no good. Thieving is in her blood. She gets it from Vernon Jr. Now he was in the hardware department chasing his brother with a hammer. And all little Roger was doing was screaming. Somehow Vernon Jr. broke a solid steel J.C. Penney hammer. When it comes to destruction, Vernon Jr. is a genius. But I tell you, it’s the last time I go shopping with those kids. I took the little darlings over to Vern’s mother’s place. She has a nice big house. They ought to have it leveled in about an hour or so.

 

A

 

Hattie: Elizabeth you’re getting all sentimental and romantic.

Of course Hattie has some advice for her yearning-for-the-past friend Elizabeth.

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A

 

B

 

C

 

And there you have it, some monologues. For quality female contemporary monologues, please check out Adam Szymkowicz’ Pretty Theft and Rare Birds as well as Incendiary. There’s also My Name is Tania Head by Alexandra Wood.

PS if you ever wondered what Laundry and Bourbon being rehearsed in Indonesian looks like, now is your chance. And yeah, the director is kind of a dick (like a lot of American directors I’ve known).